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Research Article

From Concerned to Cautiously Optimistic: Assessing Faculty Perceptions and Knowledge of Open Access in a Campus-Wide Study

Author:

Annie M Gaines

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Idaho
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Abstract

INTRODUCTION Though open access publishing has many advantages for scholars, very few are interested in learning about and pursuing open access publishing. This article discusses the results of a survey administered to faculty across disciplines at a single university to assess their perceptions, knowledge, and perceived knowledge of open access publishing and related topics. METHODS Anonymous electronic survey of 240 faculty members with a response rate of 23%. RESULTS Although many respondents considered themselves familiar with open access, very few had practical knowledge of open access publishing. Faculty were uncertain about the value and reliability of open access publishing and were particularly concerned about its applicability in the promotion and tenure process. CONCLUSION Misinformation, lack of motivation, and fear appear to be the main causes of negative perceptions of open access among faculty surveyed. Though science faculty had the highest overall perceived knowledge of open access, they were also most likely to view open access negatively and to believe that the current publishing model works well. Education faculty were more likely to think highly of open access publishing, in part due to a lack of funding for that discipline. Librarians and information professionals should take a tailored approach to discussing open access with faculty by working within the knowledge of the discipline if possible.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1212
How to Cite: Gaines, A.M., (2015). From Concerned to Cautiously Optimistic: Assessing Faculty Perceptions and Knowledge of Open Access in a Campus-Wide Study. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 3(1), p.eP1212. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1212
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Published on 22 Jun 2015.
Peer Reviewed

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